Puff Chrissy’s Shelf Porn: Part 8


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And welcome back to Part 8 of Puff Chrissy’s Shelf Porn. In this feature, I take a weekly look at one of my book shelves and throw out some thoughts about the books living there. Let’s get started…

I know one person who is going to be mad at me when I say this, but I realize that David Foster Wallace’s Brief Interviews with Hideous Men is one of those books I’ve not read. I know it was on my Reading Pile for some time, but I suppose it ended up on a shelf instead. Also, I remember buying this book off a bargain shelf in Tampa for my first flight to Poland. Back to the Reading Pile you go.

A fascinating read about Andre Breton’s life in Mark Polizzotti’s biography, Revolution of the Mind. I’m a huge fan of Breton and I have a soft spot for the surrealist writers. A book well worth your time, even if you have a peripheral interest in the subject.

The Sandman Companion by Hy Bender is a wonderful, er, companion to the Sandman series. I remember really loving this book back when I was mesmerized in the books. It’s been a long time since I’ve cracked this book open, but I’m confident I’d love it just as much.

Back when I was working on the Invisible Histories series, I wanted to have a book for quick references to mythology. And while The Friendly Guide to Mythology by Nancy Hathaway may seem like a light addition to the library, it’s a surprisingly strong and engaging look at mythology. Nice work here.

One of my many Jim Crace books, Six isn’t one of my favorites. Crace is one of those writers that is constantly shedding his writing identity, so you never know what to expect with his newest book. This is one of his colder stories, but still interesting and clever. It wouldn’t be the first book of Crace I’d recommend. I’ll get to that one later.

Do you know how hard it is to find a hardcover copy of Forty Stories by Donald Barthelme? It is. And I’m so happy to have one.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon is so unbelievably awesome it’s ridiculous. I was sitting on a beach in Tunisia reading this, surrounded by beauty and things I’d never see again, and I couldn’t get my face out of this book.

Neil Gaiman returns with three more books, Angels & Visitations, Stardust, and Smoke and Mirrors. All of them very good. Angels & Visitations is one of his early books and I remember struggling to find it (back in the days when having Gaiman in your local bookstore was unusual). I’m particularly proud of the copy of Stardust, as it’s not only signed by Gaiman, but doodled in as well.

Alan Moore dense novel Voice of the Fire isn’t for the faint of heart. I really appreciate what Moore is setting out to do here, but I can’t say it’s particularly entertaining. If you do read it, don’t let the first part stop you. It gets easier.

George Pelecanos’ Soul Circus is one of his better books, keeping in mind that a bad book by Pelecanos is light years better than most.

The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida was the second book I bought for my first flight to Poland. A good read, but not as mind blowing as I had hoped it would be. Not that I know what I was expecting…

The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman is a cool book with a lot of game-changer ideas. Really worth your time, as I feel the ideas here are still worth considering.

Kurt Vonnegut’s Bagombo Snuff Box is a nice collection of his short fiction. Not all perfect, but it’s a nice way to see Vonnegut’s evolution as a writer in one package.

Speaking of short stories, Elmore Leonard’s When the Women Come Out to Dance collection is a great read from a great writer. He makes it look so easy.

Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland isn’t my favorite by him. I’m partial to Generation X for one specific reason (which I’ll get to later) and his All Families Are Psychotic is hysterical and a flat out solid read.

That’s it for this week. See you next Friday when I look to the shelf to the right of this one.

And welcome back to Part 8 of Puff Chrissy’s Shelf Porn. In this feature, I take a weekly look at one of my book shelves and throw out some thoughts about the books living there. Let’s get started…

I know one person who is going to be mad at me when I say this, but I realize that David Foster Wallace’s Brief Interviews with Hideous Men is one of those books I’ve not read. I know it was on my Reading Pile for some time, but I suppose it ended up on a shelf instead. Also, I remember buying this book off a bargain shelf in Tampa for my first flight to Poland. Back to the Reading Pile you go.

A fascinating read about Andre Breton’s life in Mark Polizzotti’s biography, Revolution of the Mind. I’m a huge fan of Breton and I have a soft spot for the surrealist writers. A book well worth your time, even if you have a peripheral interest in the subject.

The Sandman Companion by Hy Bender is a wonderful, er, companion to the Sandman series. I remember really loving this book back when I was mesmerized in the books. It’s been a long time since I’ve cracked this book open, but I’m confident I’d love it just as much.

Back when I was working on the Invisible Histories series, I wanted to have a book for quick references to mythology. And while The Friendly Guide to Mythology by Nancy Hathaway may seem like a light addition to the library, it’s a surprisingly strong and engaging look at mythology. Nice work here.

One of my many Jim Crace books, Six isn’t one of my favorites. Crace is one of those writers that is constantly shedding his writing identity, so you never know what to expect with his newest book. This is one of his colder stories, but still interesting and clever. It wouldn’t be the first book of Crace I’d recommend. I’ll get to that one later.

Do you know how hard it is to find a hardcover copy of Forty Stories by Donald Barthelme? It is. And I’m so happy to have one.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon is so unbelievably awesome it’s ridiculous. I was sitting on a beach in Tunisia reading this, surrounded by beauty and things I’d never see again, and I couldn’t get my face out of this book.

Neil Gaiman returns with three more books, Angels & Visitations, Stardust, and Smoke and Mirrors. All of them very good. Angels & Visitations is one of his early books and I remember struggling to find it (back in the days when having Gaiman in your local bookstore was unusual). I’m particularly proud of the copy of Stardust, as it’s not only signed by Gaiman, but doodled in as well.

Alan Moore dense novel Voice of the Fire isn’t for the faint of heart. I really appreciate what Moore is setting out to do here, but I can’t say it’s particularly entertaining. If you do read it, don’t let the first part stop you. It gets easier.

George Pelecanos’ Soul Circus is one of his better books, keeping in mind that a bad book by Pelecanos is light years better than most.

The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida was the second book I bought for my first flight to Poland. A good read, but not as mind blowing as I had hoped it would be. Not that I know what I was expecting…

The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman is a cool book with a lot of game-changer ideas. Really worth your time, as I feel the ideas here are still worth considering.

Kurt Vonnegut’s Bagombo Snuff Box is a nice collection of his short fiction. Not all perfect, but it’s a nice way to see Vonnegut’s evolution as a writer in one package.

Speaking of short stories, Elmore Leonard’s When the Women Come Out to Dance collection is a great read from a great writer. He makes it look so easy.

Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland isn’t my favorite by him. I’m partial to Generation X for one specific reason (which I’ll get to later) and his All Families Are Psychotic is hysterical and a flat out solid read.

That’s it for this week. See you next Friday when I look to the shelf to the right of this one.

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About Christian A. Dumais

Christian A. Dumais is an American writer, humorist and public speaker living in Wrocław, Poland. He has published fiction, journalism, and academic articles in several magazines and journals such as GUD, Shock Totem and Ha!Art. His first collection of short stories, Empty Rooms Lonely Countries, was published in 2009. He also created, edited, and contributed to Cover Stories, a euphictional anthology of 100 stories inspired by songs, which was published in 2010. His most recent book is SMASHED: The Life and Tweets of Drunk Hulk.

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